City Level

In most major U.S. cities, the achievement gap between students from low-income families and their peers stagnated or grew between 2011-14.

Nearly every major U.S. city is home to a large or massive achievement gap.

Some of the biggest U.S. cities like El Paso, New York and San Francisco are among the 10 cities with the smallest achievement gaps.

Of the 100 major U.S. cities, eight have small achievement gaps, 25 have large achievement gaps and 67 have massive achievement gaps.

Some cities with high concentrations of free and reduced lunch students are those that are most equitable.

Two of the three major U.S. cities with the smallest achievement gaps – Hialeah and Miami – are both in the same school district – Miami-Dade County Public Schools.

School Level

Only two in 10 students from low-income families in major U.S. cities attend a school with a small or nonexistent achievement gap.

Schools with massive achievement gaps in one year are highly likely to have a massive achievement gap the next year.

Most U.S. cities are home to fewer than 10 schools that serve primarily students from low-income families and boast a small or nonexistent achievement gap.

Half of the schools recognized as having a nonexistent or small achievement gap are elementary schools.

Only six percent of students from low-income families in the largest 100 U.S. cities attend a school with no achievement gap.